Bill McKibben on Dampening the Blow of a Spiraling Climate /64

Brooks Range, Alaska. Photo by Willie the Wanderer

Brooks Range, Alaska. Photo by Willie the Wanderer

Today we join Bill Mckibben from Vermont to discuss the news from the frontline of climate chaos and resistance. We discuss potential scenarios regarding the fate of modern civilizations and the imperative to survive and restore biodiversity. Bill McKibben is an author and environmentalist. His 1989 book The End of Nature is regarded as the first book for a general audience about climate change, and has appeared in 24 languages; he’s gone on to write a dozen more books and receive the Right Livelihood Prize. He is a founder of 350.org, the first planet-wide, grassroots climate change movement, which has organized twenty thousand rallies around the world in every country save North Korea, spearheaded the resistance to the Keystone Pipeline, and launched the fast-growing fossil fuel divestment movement. A former staff writer for the New Yorker, he writes frequently for a wide variety of publications around the world, including the New York Review of Books, National Geographic, and Rolling Stone. He lives in the mountains above Lake Champlain with his wife, the writer Sue Halpern, where he spends as much time as possible outdoors. In 2014, biologists honored him by naming a new species of woodland gnat (Megophthalmidia mckibbeni) in his honor.

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