Salmon

Salmon are an icon of Cascadia. Their presence weaves threads of connectivity between marine, freshwater, and temperate rainforest systems and has nourished human and ecological communities for thousands of years. The five species of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus sp.)— sockeye, Coho, chum, Chinook, and pink— were once widespread from central California to the Bering Strait ...

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Ayana YoungComment
Cascadia

Cascadia, a bioregion spanning 2,500 miles along the Pacific coast from northern California to south-central Alaska, is home to the largest temperate rainforest in the world (25,46). Thousands of islands dapple Cascadia’s rugged northern coast, a land where spirit bears, wolves, ancient trees, salmon, and human have flourished mutually in an inextricably entwined web for millennia ...

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Ayana YoungComment
Redwoods

The coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) is a mythical and iconic being, reaching the tallest height of any life form on the planet, with a maximum recorded height of 379-ft (28). The redwood is a shade-tolerant species with thick fire resistant bark, capable of reaching an ancient age of 2,200 years (31). Seedlings vigorously resprout from cut stumps, fallen trees, and root crowns ...

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Ayana YoungRedwoodsComment
Tongass

The Tongass National Forest lies in the northern reaches of Cascadia, on a narrow coastal stretch (~160 km wide) in southeastern Alaska. The Tongass is the largest national forest in the nation, sharing boundaries with Glacier Bay National Park and Chugach National Forest. Together, they make up more than one fourth of the world’s coastal temperate rainforest. The Tongass’ 17 million acres ...

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Ayana YoungTongassComment