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FIGHT FOR FREE AND WILD SALMON RIVERS: INTERVIEW WITH CHIEF CALEEN SISK

Humans and Nature: Article / SEP 24, 2018

Welcome to For the Wild podcast. I’m Ayana Young. Today we have the honor of speaking with Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual leader and tribal chief of the Winnemem Wintu, who practice their traditional culture and ceremonies in their territory along the McCloud River in Northern California. Since assuming leadership responsi- bilities in 2000, Caleen has focused on maintaining the cul- tural and religious traditions of the tribe.

She advocates for California salmon restoration, healthy, undammed water- sheds, and the human right to water. She has received inter- national honors as a sacred site protector and currently leads the tribe’s resistance against the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation’s proposal to raise Shasta Dam eighteen feet, inundating more than forty sacred sites. She currently leads her tribe’s e orts to work with Maori and federal sh biologists to return wild Chinook salmon from New Zealand to the McCloud River.

 
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How One Woman and Her Nonprofit Are Saving Our Forests

goop: Article / SEP 05, 2018

Think of it as the most unlikely result of Occupy Wall Street: the creation of an environmental nonprofit called For the Wild. It was 2011, and Ayana Young, then a Columbia University ecology student, was feeling “empty, a cumulative sense that something just wasn’t right.” Young was overwhelmed by the earth’s disintegrating health—the climate chaos, the mountains of trash, the mass extinction—but felt like she had no way of voicing it. That’s when she saw the protestors in Zuccotti Park. “They put a vocabulary to what I was feeling,” she says. “I was finally in a community that was talking about the things that I was struggling with for so long.”

 
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ONE MILLION REDWOODS PROJECT– Planting for the Future

Nexpected: Article / APR 28, 2018

Stemming from a long-term vision for the reforestation and renewal of temperate rainforests throughout the Cascadian bioregion, FOR THE WILD’s 1 Million Redwoods Project and native species nursery is wielding the intelligence of nature to push back against climate change and mass extinction.

In the wake of the unfaltering extraction of fossil fuels and an abundance of shortsighted technological climate-fixes, For The Wild believes that the strongest potential for mitigating anthropogenic climate change lies in enriching the forest ecosystems that have been unparalleled in their capacity to draw carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere for millennia. ...

 
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FOR THE WILD'S ORIGINAL FILM ‘WHEN OLD GROWTH ENDS’ SELECTED TO COMPETE AT SXSW

comeherefloyd: Article by CHF STAFF / APR 12, 2018

The Tongass National Forest is the world’s largest remaining temperate old growth rainforest, home to some of last healthy salmon runs on Earth. In 2016, after interviewing EarthJustice’s lead attorney, Tom Waldo, about the destruction of these precious forest ecosystems, Ayana Young felt called to take a stand for the Tongass. Assuming the ambitious role of a first time film director, producer and editor, Ayana led an all woman crew to Southeast Alaska to produce For The Wild’s first film, When Old Growth Ends. Emotional and heart wrenching, the film is a love story through the eyes of the salmon, the old-growth trees, the indigenous peoples who call the Tongass home, and a group of women with a passion for protecting wild places. The film will be premiering on Sunday, March 11th, at the annual Films for the Forest Competition at South By Southwest (SXSW). The film will also be featured at additional festivals throughout the year.

 
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THE BEST 'GREEN' PODCASTS

Garden Collage: Article by Molly Beauchemin / FEB 08, 2018

For The Wild features hard-hitting and emotionally engaging stories featuring engaging activist personalities like Bill McKibben on “Dampening the Blow of a Spiraling Climate.” They also have conversations with experts like pioneering oceanographer Dr. Sylvia A. Earle– the first female chief scientist of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, a celebrated best-selling scientific author, and a woman who has lead over 100 expeditions and logged over 7,000 hours underwater. If nothing more, this episode alone is worth listening to on repeat!

 
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FOR THE WILD PODCAST EPISODE W/ ANGELO BACA OF BEARS EARS

Honor the Earth: Article by Partick Tsai / FEB 06, 2018

Feature of For The Wild's Podcast with Angelo Baca: As a PhD student in the department of anthropology at New York University, Angelo has research interests in indigenous international repatriation, indigenous food sovereignty, and sacred lands protection. He promotes a local participatory research methodology and empowering traditional knowledge keepers. He has taught a variety of Native American and Indigenous course topics from college to Ivy league university settings. As a documentary film-maker, Angelo has developed digital storytelling projects in close collaboration with indigenous communities. His latest film is Shash Jaa': Bears Ears. He is the co-president of the Native American and Indigenous Students Group at NYU, assisting in facilitating an Indigenous Studies Program minor at the institution and he is on the selection committee for the Chief Diversity Officer at NYU.

 
 

ONE MILLION REDWOODS

Bart Station Bard: Blog Article / DEC 24, 2017

I ran across the One Million Redwoods kickstarter  today. The thing that really brought me on board is that, besides the fact that this project is already underway, they are not just planting redwoods, but the whole forest community. They understand the difference between a tree farm and a forest, and they are doing the desperately needed work of reforestation that will save us all, if we do enough of it in time.

Trees are the cheapest, fastest carbon sinks we have to hand. They are proven technology, the planet’s own way of locking up the surfeit we’ve thrown into the atmosphere over the last few hundred years. More than that, trees and humans are interdependent. We breathe each others’ exhalations–literally. We need forest products for so many things, food and fuel and the houses we live in. Our bodies and our waste products can feed the forest, if we do it properly. We are happier and healthier living around trees–we are so dependent that even when we cut down the forest to build our cities we plant replacement trees. Our relationship is so obvious and natural to us that we don’t even see it any more, even when it’s all around us....

 
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THE END IS THE BEGINNING: Reforestation at the End of the World w/ Ayana Young

Star Seed Survival Guide: Podcast Interview by Yaya Erin Rivera Merriman / DEC 19, 2017

In this Episode you will learn:

  • What it means to be planting 1 million redwoods at the end of the age of loneliness

  • Why a women’s perspective and capacity to “embody the dichotomy” of our times is critical to the climate change movement

  • How sacred rage can function as a gateway into a scouring, purifying grief that paves the way for a more creative, emotionally evocative, sensually fulfilling form of  activism

 
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AYANA YOUNG ON EDUCATION THROUGH CONSERVATION {episode 84}

Ladies Who Lead: Podcast Interview with Luna Love / DEC 11, 2017

The Ladies Who Lead Podcast is the voice of a movement. Today women are being called to step forward into their birthright as leaders. To do so we must model a new way: leadership where actions are aligned with our hearts knowing, where self-care is a priority, where we support and encourage others to step into their greatness and provide ways for them to do so. Ladies Who Lead is the platform that features the voices and stories of the women you want to hear from. Join the movement.

 
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AYANA YOUNG ON ECOLOGICAL ACTIVISM & LIVING FOR THE WILD

Future Fossils: Podcast Interview by Michael Garfield / DEC 5, 2017 

We talk about:

  • Her transition from anonymous, germaphobic suburban consumer to restoration ecologist, activist, and dirt-working spokesperson for the world’s last remaining wilderness

  • Being a person of place and cultivating a personal relationship with our wild (and not-so-wild) lands

  • Love in a time of catastrophe and how to FEEL our impact on a planetary scale

  • What wilderness means in The Anthropocene and what ought to guide our decisions in restoration ecology (not just “restoring to 200 years ago” as if that’s the best goal)

  • Restoring not extinct ecosystems but biodiversity and resiliency

  • The joy of personal sacrifice to a cause and purpose greater than yourself

  • What inspires her to keep going against all obstacles to the Good Work

  • How to be an empowered activist and servant in love with life and your imperfect self

  • Picking yourself up after failure

 
 
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HELP PLANT 1 MILLION REDWOOD TREES WITHOUT LIFTING A FINGER

InsideHook: Article by Reuben Brody / DEC 1, 2017

This year, the thermostat in Los Angeles hit a record-shattering 93 degrees ... on Thanksgiving. While climate change deniers need to do some serious self-reflection, the rest of us need to acknowledge that it’s going to take a lot more than Tesla batteries to keep temps down.

Carbon emissions not only needs to be halted, it needs to be captured.

The treehuggers at For The Wild have an idea that not only sounds warm and fuzzy, but could also provide future generations with a more diverse ecosystem to wander through. Their 1 Million Redwoods Project, now on Kickstarter, aims to cultivate redwood saplings as well as understory from plants and fungi for transplanting to areas that have been deforested for lumber.

This approach has some legs. A full-grown tree can....

 
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 AYANA YOUNG ON CREATIVE STEWARDSHIP, GRIEVING WITH THE EARTH, AND RUNNING TOWARDS YOUR PASSION

Dream Freedom Beauty: Podcast Interview by Natalie Ross / NOV 23, 2017

Ayana Young is a lover and protector of wild nature who teaches about empowered earth stewardship, leads biodiversity enhancement workshops, and facilitates panels across North America. In this episode we talk about:

  • Why it is so necessary right now to allow yourself to feel this intensely heartbreaking time, as someone who loves the earth

  • Why you are biologically born a steward of the earth, and what that truly means

  • How living on the land is a much more powerful learning experience than any textbook has to offer

  • Learning to find respect, kindness, creativity, and flexibility with land restoration

  • Renewal ecology vs restoration

  • Why being honest with yourself and grieving leads to empathy for the earth and teaches true reciprocity

  • Why you have to solidify your love for the earth with outward action

  • Why self care is such an important piece of activism and caring for the earth

  • What it means to be pro community health and what creative vision can look like

  • How stepping into your passion is courageous and essential to living a fulfilled life