Eriel Deranger on Radicality Amid Expanding Tarsands /45

A river's many backwaters and oxbow lakes, threatened by tarsands expansion in Northern Alberta.

A river's many backwaters and oxbow lakes, threatened by tarsands expansion in Northern Alberta.

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In this episode we speak with activist Eriel Tchekwie Deranger about the largest industrial project in the world, the Tarsands in Alberta, Canada, and strategize about the future of the fossil fuel resistance. We discuss institutional warfare waged by extractive industry on indigenous sovereignty, land rights, and the boreal forest—“the other Amazon”—Earth’s preeminent carbon sink. We cover the political manipulation that has secured new oil and gas pipeline construction in Canada despite exuberant public outcry, and how a movement must target the source and the motive of the extraction, not just the routes of transport.
Eriel is an Indigenous rights advocate and member of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation (ACFN), Treaty 8 of Northern Alberta, Canada. She works to raise awareness about the negative climate, human and Indigenous rights impacts of the extractive industry in her Nations traditional lands and territory. Eriel is a founder of Indigenous Climate Action, a national Indigenous civil society vehicle to push for a united Indigenous climate action strategy in Canada. She has worked with various Indigenous and non­ Indigenous organizations, including the Federation of Saskatchewan Indian Nations, Indigenous Environmental Network, Sierra Club, Rainforest Action Network and the UN Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change. She is married and mother of two and currently resides in Edmonton, Canada.

Ayana YoungComment